Thursday, August 3, 2017

Loyalty Should Be A Quality Found In Players And The Coaches That Govern Them

Story and Video by Dominique Patrick


video

SYRACUSE, N.Y. -- Some may argue that college athletes could find themselves mishandled due to the rules and regulations he or she must abide by.

Some may argue, it seems kind of ridiculous for a player dealing with the potential risk of sitting out a year because of unhappiness at their current college or simply don’t fit in.

College is supposed to be the glory years, full of fond memories and happiness. But, for college athletes, it could be the most skeptical years, full of uncertainty and confusion. Sports are the escape. The arena--the home away from home. The field--the ultimate stress reliever. How can athletes enjoy time spent playing he game he or she possibly loves when there are so many rules and regulations hindering the discovery of who they truly are and where they truly belong.

Who has the right to say that he or she must be punished for wanting to be in a better environment--more or less, on a better team? Funny, a coach can, usually, come and go as he or she pleases. When that coach is done sucking the time, the energy and the life out of their players. The coach could potentially achieve new goals and reach new heights for the program. But, those new successes could often leave players high and dry when coaches are promoted for their progression in the program. This promotion could involve coaching a different team next year. The coaches' current players have a level of comfort, now. Playing for their coach or maybe even forming a bond is the most beautiful feeling about sports. Suddenly, it is all snatched away from them. A new coach leading the team in a completely different way. The stable level of comfort is now an awkwardness when you realize your new coach has a new style. "Fitting in" all over again is a difficult task for both player and coach. 

The NCAA states on their website that it may require you to sit out of competition for a year after transferring in order to help you "adjust" to a new school. That sounds great, but isn’t a incoming freshman a new player trying to get "adjusted" to a new school? How can freshmen come in and play as a freshman, but when he or she wants to leave their current school, sitting out is the excuse to help with getting “adjusted”.

The bottom line is if players have to show loyalty to a team or suffer the consequences, a coach should as well.

The following links are of a few controversial topics dealing with transfers and coaches leaving:



https://www.sbnation.com/college-football/2015/2/6/7993309/ncaa-recruits-coaching-changes


https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/college/2014/01/16/ncaa-convention-college-athlete-transfer-rule/4524209/

My commentary is transcribed below.

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Some may argue that college athletes could find themselves mishandled due to the rules and regulations they have to abide by.


Some may argue, it seems kind of ridiculous for a player ever having to deal with the risk of sitting out a year because they are unhappy or simply don’t fit in. Who has the right to say that they must be punished for wanting to be in a better environment or even on a better team. It’s funny because a coach can come and go as he or she pleases. When that coach is done sucking the life, time and energy out of their players. They can reach new heights and leave them high and dry.

The NCAA may require you to sit out of competition for a year after transferring to help you adjust to your new school. But isn’t a freshman a new player trying to get adjust to a new school? How can they come in a play but when they want to leave sitting out is the excuse in order to get “adjusted."

The bottom line is if players have to have loyalty to a team or suffer the consequences so should a coach.

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